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stileshasbadjuju:

Let’s be real though, Dylan O’Brien seriously deserved an Emmy nod for his performance in Teen Wolf this year. I mean:

He got to play someone possessed by a psychotic demon:

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A completely terrified and traumatised teenager getting tormented by said demon:

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AND THEN HE SWITCHES BETWEEN THEM IN SECONDS LIKE IT’S NO BIG DEAL

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(Like even if you don’t watch Teen Wolf I’m sure anyone can see what a damn great actor this dude is, and he’s going to be HUGE in the future)

(via timtampon)

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timtampon:

theroyaltenenblarghs:

lipstickstainedlove:

descentintotyranny:

Israel begins its ground invasion of the Gaza Strip

Fucking signal boost this shit

This is one of the most horrific things happening in the world and yet I can’t seem to find out any news about it.

Ambulances are being shot by tanks. Doctors, civilians, children playing on the beach and everyone else are all being killed.

No. This is not true. Stop being so ignorant and believing everything that is said on the media.
Let me break it down for you all. Hamas is a terrorist group. Hamas is running Gaza. Hamas is firing at Israel, and have been doing so for years. Hamas hides behind innocent civilians, hiding rockets under hospitals, schools, civilian houses and other buildings. Israel needs to defend itself, It has no choice but to fire back. Israel sends warnings, giving people the chance to evacuate and escape. Israel has offered a peace treaty, which Hamas has declined. 
Israel is surrounded by enemies, and the media is warped, corrupted and wrong. Yes, innocent people are dying on both sides, but this war is Hamas’s fault. Educate yourselves. 

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sunwukong-stoaway:

ringaroundtheprose:

the-captain-of-davesol:

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THE ULTIMATE FUCKING POST

You know it’s good when you bother to scroll all the way back up just to reblog it.

…Wait scroll up HOW OLD IS THIS THING

(Source: muumajii, via twotabletaylor)

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atane:

slimgoodymakeba:

rissaisangry:

dglsplsblg:

Staten Island man dies after NYPD cop puts him in chokehold — SEE THE VIDEO

A 400-pound asthmatic Staten Island dad died Thursday after a cop put him in a chokehold and other officers appeared to slam his head against the sidewalk, video of the incident shows.
“I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe!” Eric Garner, 43, repeatedly screamed after at least five NYPD officers took him down in front of a Tompkinsville beauty supply store when he balked at being handcuffed.
Within moments Garner, a married father of six children with two grandchildren, stopped struggling and appeared to be unconscious as police called paramedics to the scene. An angry crowd gathered, some recording with smartphones.
“When I kissed my husband this morning, I never thought it would be for the last time,” Garner’s wife, Esaw, told the Daily News.
She got no details from police until after she had gone to the hospital to identify his body, she said.
“I saw him with his eyes wide open and I said, ‘Babe, don’t leave me, I need you.’ But he was already gone,” she said.

and people wonder why black people don’t trust or have any love for cops. they murdered this man. this black man. and for what? fucking cigarettes. yea, WE’RE the fucking problem.
 






Nypd police are a plague on society.

  #how do you tag something so fucked up?
It’s easy actually

This happened not far from where I live. These cops are from the 120th precinct, and that precinct is notorious for this type of bullshit. It’s just that there usually isn’t video footage of their crimes. That said, this isn’t the first time they have killed before. One case that made the headlines back in the 90s was a young Black man they killed named Ernest Sayon. His parents were Liberian immigrants. Police said he “suffered a head injury” and just died at the hospital. No explanation. They said he was struggling and hit his head. The truth is that they viciously beat him up in his own apartment and he died because of it. People took to the streets in protest. The 120th precinct also has a holding cell and people have mysteriously died or committed suicide in there. These alleged suicides are always the same. Hanging in their cell. Those rarely make the news, and if they do, it doesn’t get coverage beyond the local Staten Island advance newspaper. Essentially, no one hears about it. If the victim has priors or is a felon, then you’ll definitely not here about it. Society tends to be uncaring towards victims who are felons.
The police here do “sweeps” where they will literally canvas a neighborhood and arrest dozens of Black men in the hopes that one of them has an outstanding warrant for something. They do it because they have quotas to fill. They are especially vicious in certain neighborhoods here like Park Hill, Stapleton, West Brighton, New Brighton, Tompkinsville, Arlington and Mariners Harbor. They operate like a gang. Also, plainclothes officers never identify themselves and they instigate on purpose. Conflicts arise because they never identify themselves as cops and they just start harassing people. People respond to what they rightfully assume is an attack and they arrest them for “assaulting an officer” and “resisting arrest”. They do whatever they like.
This is the reason why they were brazen about literally choking Eric Garner in public in broad day light. This is how they act and they get away with it. Staten Island is a bit different from the other 4 NYC boroughs. It’s the most outwardly hostile in terms of race relations. The North Shore is predominantly Black and Brown (though white people live here too). The South Shore is predominantly white. Black folks here know not to go to the South Shore alone, especially at night. Unless you’re a student athlete who plays football on one of the high school teams. Then you can bring your black ass over!
Outside of Black & Brown communities, the NYPD is heavily supported here. Every Italian and Irish person here seems to have a dad, brother, uncle, cousin or best friend who is a cop. Judges are their friends. District attorneys are their buddies. The guy who owns the local bar is the lieutenant’s brother-in-law. Some other guy’s grandfather knew the sergeant’s family back in the old country (Italy) etc. That’s how it goes. You’re just not going to win against these people. It’s a system and it goes beyond the cops. They’re all connected. The white folks here are compliant because these cops are their kin and they protect them at all costs, even when they kill.
Do you remember Justin Volpe? He was the cop who shoved a broomstick up Abner Louima's rectum. His crimes were so brutal that even he couldn't get away with it. Volpe is from Staten Island. He just worked at a Brooklyn precinct. Volpe got big time support here. His family is still here. They are “pillars of the community”.
I’ve been stopped and frisked here in the past so many times, particularly in the St. George area that one of the cops felt bad after a while because he realized he was stopping me all the time. The cops in the St. George area as well as the Staten Island ferry terminal with the K9 units are basically stationed there. The last time this cop stopped me, he just let me go. He didn’t do the routine pat down (including grabbing my junk), emptying my pockets, searching my bag and generally just wasting my time. I suppose he had some remnants of humanity left because he got ashamed that he was constantly harassing me. He was one of the “nice ones” I guess. His constant harassment and rummaging through my camera bag that yielded nothing but my camera and lenses embarrassed him. I never argue with cops (I’m not arguing with people that have guns), so even when they were rude and rough, I kept my cool. Plus, the St. George cops often have dogs. Not trying to get bit or shot.
I know the Staten Island cop mentality well. I went to school with them. I played football with and against them. All the degenerates, lowlifes, racists and scumbags I knew are now either cops or correction officers. The thing is this though, when you point this out, some apologist (always white) will start talking about how it’s “not all cops” and that some are good etc. This doesn’t matter. The system they serve is corrupt. They work with arrest quotas, which means they will violate and brutalize people to make numbers, including choking a man in broad day light until he dies.
I don’t expect anything major to happen to these cops that killed Mr. Garner. There will be an “internal investigation”, which just means their drinking buddies will overlook the case, maybe put them on desk duty or suspend them with pay. That’s how it goes.

atane:

slimgoodymakeba:

rissaisangry:

dglsplsblg:

Staten Island man dies after NYPD cop puts him in chokehold — SEE THE VIDEO

A 400-pound asthmatic Staten Island dad died Thursday after a cop put him in a chokehold and other officers appeared to slam his head against the sidewalk, video of the incident shows.

“I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe!” Eric Garner, 43, repeatedly screamed after at least five NYPD officers took him down in front of a Tompkinsville beauty supply store when he balked at being handcuffed.

Within moments Garner, a married father of six children with two grandchildren, stopped struggling and appeared to be unconscious as police called paramedics to the scene. An angry crowd gathered, some recording with smartphones.

“When I kissed my husband this morning, I never thought it would be for the last time,” Garner’s wife, Esaw, told the Daily News.

She got no details from police until after she had gone to the hospital to identify his body, she said.

“I saw him with his eyes wide open and I said, ‘Babe, don’t leave me, I need you.’ But he was already gone,” she said.

and people wonder why black people don’t trust or have any love for cops. they murdered this man. this black man. and for what? fucking cigarettes. yea, WE’RE the fucking problem.

 

Nypd police are a plague on society.

  #how do you tag something so fucked up?

It’s easy actually

This happened not far from where I live. These cops are from the 120th precinct, and that precinct is notorious for this type of bullshit. It’s just that there usually isn’t video footage of their crimes. That said, this isn’t the first time they have killed before. One case that made the headlines back in the 90s was a young Black man they killed named Ernest Sayon. His parents were Liberian immigrants. Police said he “suffered a head injury” and just died at the hospital. No explanation. They said he was struggling and hit his head. The truth is that they viciously beat him up in his own apartment and he died because of it. People took to the streets in protest. The 120th precinct also has a holding cell and people have mysteriously died or committed suicide in there. These alleged suicides are always the same. Hanging in their cell. Those rarely make the news, and if they do, it doesn’t get coverage beyond the local Staten Island advance newspaper. Essentially, no one hears about it. If the victim has priors or is a felon, then you’ll definitely not here about it. Society tends to be uncaring towards victims who are felons.

The police here do “sweeps” where they will literally canvas a neighborhood and arrest dozens of Black men in the hopes that one of them has an outstanding warrant for something. They do it because they have quotas to fill. They are especially vicious in certain neighborhoods here like Park Hill, Stapleton, West Brighton, New Brighton, Tompkinsville, Arlington and Mariners Harbor. They operate like a gang. Also, plainclothes officers never identify themselves and they instigate on purpose. Conflicts arise because they never identify themselves as cops and they just start harassing people. People respond to what they rightfully assume is an attack and they arrest them for “assaulting an officer” and “resisting arrest”. They do whatever they like.

This is the reason why they were brazen about literally choking Eric Garner in public in broad day light. This is how they act and they get away with it. Staten Island is a bit different from the other 4 NYC boroughs. It’s the most outwardly hostile in terms of race relations. The North Shore is predominantly Black and Brown (though white people live here too). The South Shore is predominantly white. Black folks here know not to go to the South Shore alone, especially at night. Unless you’re a student athlete who plays football on one of the high school teams. Then you can bring your black ass over!

Outside of Black & Brown communities, the NYPD is heavily supported here. Every Italian and Irish person here seems to have a dad, brother, uncle, cousin or best friend who is a cop. Judges are their friends. District attorneys are their buddies. The guy who owns the local bar is the lieutenant’s brother-in-law. Some other guy’s grandfather knew the sergeant’s family back in the old country (Italy) etc. That’s how it goes. You’re just not going to win against these people. It’s a system and it goes beyond the cops. They’re all connected. The white folks here are compliant because these cops are their kin and they protect them at all costs, even when they kill.

Do you remember Justin Volpe? He was the cop who shoved a broomstick up Abner Louima's rectum. His crimes were so brutal that even he couldn't get away with it. Volpe is from Staten Island. He just worked at a Brooklyn precinct. Volpe got big time support here. His family is still here. They are “pillars of the community”.

I’ve been stopped and frisked here in the past so many times, particularly in the St. George area that one of the cops felt bad after a while because he realized he was stopping me all the time. The cops in the St. George area as well as the Staten Island ferry terminal with the K9 units are basically stationed there. The last time this cop stopped me, he just let me go. He didn’t do the routine pat down (including grabbing my junk), emptying my pockets, searching my bag and generally just wasting my time. I suppose he had some remnants of humanity left because he got ashamed that he was constantly harassing me. He was one of the “nice ones” I guess. His constant harassment and rummaging through my camera bag that yielded nothing but my camera and lenses embarrassed him. I never argue with cops (I’m not arguing with people that have guns), so even when they were rude and rough, I kept my cool. Plus, the St. George cops often have dogs. Not trying to get bit or shot.

I know the Staten Island cop mentality well. I went to school with them. I played football with and against them. All the degenerates, lowlifes, racists and scumbags I knew are now either cops or correction officers. The thing is this though, when you point this out, some apologist (always white) will start talking about how it’s “not all cops” and that some are good etc. This doesn’t matter. The system they serve is corrupt. They work with arrest quotas, which means they will violate and brutalize people to make numbers, including choking a man in broad day light until he dies.

I don’t expect anything major to happen to these cops that killed Mr. Garner. There will be an “internal investigation”, which just means their drinking buddies will overlook the case, maybe put them on desk duty or suspend them with pay. That’s how it goes.

(via erikisafail)

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naughtylokiconfessions:

Loki’s smile simultaneously scares me, intimidates me, and makes me ridiculously wet. I don’t know what’s worse; the fact that his smile actually makes me horny, or the fact that the fear and intimidation only prove to make me hornier

naughtylokiconfessions:

Loki’s smile simultaneously scares me, intimidates me, and makes me ridiculously wet. I don’t know what’s worse; the fact that his smile actually makes me horny, or the fact that the fear and intimidation only prove to make me hornier

(via whoviansoftheimpalaonbakerstreet)

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howdoyoufeelabouttheviolin:

meowkatie76:

howdoyoufeelabouttheviolin:

WATCHING FROZEN FOR THE FIRST TIME ANNA AND HANS ARE SO CUTE OMFG

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YOU KNEW. YOU ALL KNEW YOU BASTARDS. FUCKING HANS.

(via whoviansoftheimpalaonbakerstreet)

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perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

(via erikisafail)

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cumberrage:

thatonenerdybroad:

eddietg:

If you own a dog, please share.

Even if you don’t own a dog, please share

Considering how all dogs have me pegged as a sucker, I’m glad I know this list.

cumberrage:

thatonenerdybroad:

eddietg:

If you own a dog, please share.

Even if you don’t own a dog, please share

Considering how all dogs have me pegged as a sucker, I’m glad I know this list.

(via whoviansoftheimpalaonbakerstreet)

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nprhereandnow:

This is the face of Esther Earl, the amazing girl who inspired John Green’s bestseller “The Fault in Our Stars.” Her parents have published a collection of her writings, after her death in 2010 from cancer. It’s called “This Star Won’t Go Out.” Read two excerpts and hear our talk with Lori and Wayne Earl here.

nprhereandnow:

This is the face of Esther Earl, the amazing girl who inspired John Green’s bestseller “The Fault in Our Stars.” Her parents have published a collection of her writings, after her death in 2010 from cancer. It’s called “This Star Won’t Go Out.” Read two excerpts and hear our talk with Lori and Wayne Earl here.

(via whoviansoftheimpalaonbakerstreet)